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When does an e-bike officially become a moped?

When does an e-bike officially become a moped?

We look to explain the key differences between an e-bike and a moped in the below article. Hopefully this blog post provides you with the key information required to understanding the differences and when an e-bike officially becomes a moped.

In the UK, an e-bike and a moped are two different types of vehicles that are subject to different legal requirements and regulations. Here are the main differences between e-bikes and mopeds in the UK:

  1. Electric bikes, or e-bikes, are bicycles that have an electric motor that provides assistance to the rider when pedalling. In the UK, e-bikes are classified as either 'electrically assisted pedal cycles' (EAPCs) or 'electric motorcycles', depending on their power output and maximum speed.

  2. Mopeds, on the other hand, are motorised vehicles with a maximum speed of 28mph (45km/h) and an engine size of up to 50cc. Mopeds can be powered by either petrol or electricity, but they always have an engine that provides propulsion, unlike e-bikes which only provide assistance.

  3. E-bikes that are classified as EAPCs can be ridden by anyone aged 14 or over, without the need for a licence or insurance. They must have a maximum power output of 250 watts and a maximum assisted speed of 15.5mph (25km/h).

  4. Mopeds, on the other hand, can only be ridden by those who hold a valid driving licence, insurance, and registration for the vehicle. Moped riders must wear a helmet and display L-plates on the vehicle until they pass their full motorcycle test.

  5. In terms of where they can be ridden, e-bikes can be ridden on most cycle paths and roads, whereas mopeds are subject to the same rules and restrictions as motorcycles.

Overall, the main difference between e-bikes and mopeds in the UK is that e-bikes are classified as bicycles and are subject to different legal requirements, while mopeds are motorised vehicles that require a licence, insurance, and registration.

In the UK, an e-bike is classified as a bicycle if it meets the following criteria:

  1. The electric motor must have a maximum power output of 250 watts.
  2. The electric motor must stop assisting the rider when the bike reaches a speed of 15.5 mph (25 km/h).
  3. The e-bike must have pedals that can be used to propel the bike.

If an e-bike does not meet these criteria, it may be classified as a moped. In the UK, a moped is defined as a motor vehicle with two or three wheels, with an engine capacity of no more than 50cc (or an electric motor with a maximum power output of 4 kW), and a maximum speed of 28 mph (45 km/h). Mopeds require a licence, insurance, and registration to be used on public roads.

It is important to note that regulations may vary by country or region, so it is always best to check local laws and regulations to ensure that your e-bike is classified correctly.

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